January 29, 2014

Behind the Scenes of "Syria's Lost Generation"

In today's National Geographic PROOF blog, photojournalist Ed Kashi recounts his personal experiences documenting the plight of Syrian refugee children and filming/photographing for his recent project "Syria's Lost Generation."




"In November 2013, 22 years since my first forays into this region, I returned to northern Iraq and Jordan to tell the stories of some of these youth.  I wanted to create an intimate look into the lives of those caught in the middle, left in limbo, robbed of their childhoods," remembers Kashi in his guest blog post.  "As a hybrid visual storyteller, mixing still images with motion and sound is always deeply satisfying and empowering. I decided this would be the way to illustrate the plight of this lost generation."


Read more from Ed on today's National Geographic PROOF blog entry.  Watch the film "Syria's Lost Generation" (produced by Talking Eyes Media) on Time.com

January 28, 2014

NYTimes Lens Blog Features Ed Kashi's Sugarcane Project

A busy coffin maker in Chichigalpa; nearly every day,
a sugarcane workers dies in the CKDu epidemic.
©Ed Kashi/VIIPhoto
With the support of the La Isla Foundation, photojournalist (and TEM co-founder) Ed Kashi made two trips to Nicaragua in 2013 to investigate and document the mysterious circumstances surrounding the epidemic of Chronic Kidney Disease of Unknown origin (CKDu).  The disease is sickening and killing thousands of sugarcane workers in Central America, and is a global issue with a presence in southern Mexico, Ecuador,  Sri Lanka, India, and other tropical and subtropical countries.

In the Nicaraguan town of Chichigalpa, often called the "Island of Widows," nearly 1-in-3 men, mostly cane workers, are in end-stage renal failure. Their average lifespan is 49 years.

Today, The New York Times' Lens Blog spotlights Ed's work in Nicaragua. Click this link to view the Lens Blog article and more of Ed's images.

Ed is currently raising money in order to return to Nicaragua and continue documenting those affected by kidney disease.  His hope is for his work to be used by schools, nongovernmental organizations, and the local community to raise awareness about the issue and spur dialogue and solution.

Click below to learn more about Ed's campaign and to donate:

A 29-year-old worker of CKDu.
©Ed Kashi/VIIPhoto







January 23, 2014

View Our Latest Film on Time Magazine


Since civil war broke out in Syria in March 2011, unyielding violence has left more than 2 million people displaced.  More than half of them are children. Our film, Syria's Lost Generation, examines the plight of two teenage girls whose lives have been irrevocably changed. They struggle with depression, trauma, uncertainty and lost innocence. Their plight reflects the emotional and psychological challenges faced by an entire generation of Syrians. Their fate is intertwined with the future security of the region.

This film appears on Time magazine and was facilitated by International Medical Corps.

January 17, 2014

And the nominations are....


It's Oscar season! Check out the docs that made the cut! 

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge Sørensen

Zachary Heinzerling and Lydia Dean Pilcher

Richard Rowley and Jeremy Scahill

Jehane Noujaim and Karim Amer

Nominees to be determined

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

Jeffrey Karoff

Jason Cohen

Sara Ishaq

Malcolm Clarke and Nicholas Reed

Edgar Barens

January 10, 2014

2017 Alexia Foundation Grant Deadline


The Alexia Foundation is an organization created in memory of student photographer, Alexia Tsairis, who tragically passed away in the terrorist Pan Am Lockerbie bombing of 1988, “promotes the power of photojournalism to give voice to social injustice, to respect history lest we forget it and to understand cultural difference as our strength – not our weakness.” The Alexia Foundation supports photographers seeking to make a change by awarding grants, scholarships, and special projects.


Currently The Alexia Foundation is accepting applications for the 2014 Professional and Student Grants. The Professional Grant will award $20,000 to  a photographer who proposes a project that has photographic quality that supports a well composed project.  The deadline for submission to the Professional Grant is Jan. 13, 2014. There is a $50 fee to apply for the Professional Grant.


The Student Grants will award one first place winner funding for a semester at Syracuse University London Program, a $1,000 cash grant to help fund their proposed project, a $300 gift card from Dury’s Photo, and $500 will be awarded to the academic department the student represents. There will also be similar prizes for the second place winner and three Award of Excellence Winners.

This year The Gilka Grant has been added to recognize the student applicant with the best proposal including a multimedia component. The winner will recieve a $1,500 scholarship to attend the Kalish Workshop. This award honors longtime National Geographic Director of Photography Robert Gilka, who was a supporter of The Alexia Foundation, and passed away in the summer of 2013.  The deadline for the Student Grant is Jan. 27, 2014. Apply for the Student Grant opportunities at no cost today.


January 8, 2014

What a year it's been!

TEM wishes you well in 2014!

We would especially like to thank our partners, clients, friends, 
and viewers for your continued support.

2013 was an exciting year and 2014 is off to a running start!

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IN CASE YOU MISSED IT...

Bring It to The Table re-launched its website 
and the project received a grant from The Fledgling Fund.


 Our experimental short TOMORROW
re-imagining the day before JFK's assassination,
premiered at Symphony Space in NYC.

We collaborated with the Global Post for the documentary series

Our short film Photo Journal Isms received an award from POYi
and screened at both DOC NYC and Montclair Film Festival.

For the fifth consecutive year, TEM produced multimedia

For the fourth consecutive year, TEM produced multimedia

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WHAT'S COMING IN 2014

The European Azerbaijan Society commissioned us
to produce a video highlighting the plight of 
Azerbaijan's refugees and internally displaced people.

The International Medical Corps is partnering with us
to produce a video examining the impact 
of the Syrian conflict on child refugees.

 TEM is producing a video for the Open Society Foundations
about police in Kenya and Kyrgystan who are helping
to prevent the spread of HIV-AIDS.

TEM is working with the International Rescue Committee
to produce a video about women in the Congo 
with stills and video by photojournalist Lynsey Addario. 

 We will be producing videos for the interactive website Mpala Live!, 
which will capture animals at the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya.

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Stay tuned for more to come in 2014!


January 6, 2014

Donate to Ed Kashi's Photo Project: Sugarcane Workers & Fatal Chronic Kidney Disease


Everyday we enjoy the sweet taste of sugarcane, 
but are you aware of the deadly effects it's having on those harvesting the crop?


© 2013 Ed Kashi (VII Photo)

Fatal Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown cause (CKDu) impacts 68% of men in some Nicaraguan communities.  Those affected are nearly all sugarcane workers with recent research linking the disease to the work in the fields.

In 2013, photojournalist Ed Kashi traveled to Nicaragua to visually document the day-to-day lives and ongoing struggles of CKDu-affected families in and around the town of Chichigalpa -- "ground zero" for this deadly disease.

Ed has now just launched a 60-day campaign to  raise $19,000 to retun to Chichigalpa to expand upon his initial work.  Ultimately this material could be utilized to garner support for the efforts of organizations advocating for the afflicted families and those striving to find solutions to Nicaragua's CKDu epidemic.

Please consider donating to this worthy project and help spread the word.


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To learn more about this sugarcane crisis: